Anti-Trump Protest in New York

Is protesting the result of a democratic election an effective way to create change? I can't pretend that I have the answer. But after a week of feeling shocked, and coming to terms with a Trump presidency, I decided to document the march from Union Square to Trump Tower on Saturday, November 12, 2016. I don't necessarily agree with everything said here. This is just my way of processing. When minorities are threatened, giving people who fight for them a voice, even in a small way, seems the least I can do. 

The photos listed here are in chronological order. The interviews have been condensed and edited.

Left to right: Ellen Kozac and Laura Brown.

Left to right: Ellen Kozac and Laura Brown.

Klein: Why are you here today?  

Kozac: I’m here because I’m worried about our future in this country and I am incensed about the returns on the election and issues with voting in this country and disenfranchisement and I will do anything possible over the next four years.

 Brown: I think he’s a loathsome embodiment of a hate crime and I can’t accept that this is our government. I don’t accept it.

Klein: Did you work on Hillary’s campaign at all?  

Brown: We did. We canvassed for Hillary after she won the primaries in Philadelphia. 

Megan Healey and Liz Dosta, both from Southern California.

Megan Healey and Liz Dosta, both from Southern California.

Klein: Where are you from?

Healey: We live in Brooklyn.  

Klein: Is that where you were raised?  

Dostra: No, we were raised in Southern California, in Los Angeles.

Klein: Why are you here today?  

Dostra: Because we’re protesting the recent results of the election and we feel that this is the beginning of fascism, potentially, and it’s troubling to us.  

Klein: Did you do anything before the election to campaign?

Healey: I’m a teacher. I was doing it everyday, talking to my students not hiding my political opinion. I did not campaign, but I did it in the classroom. I’m an adjunct professor so I teach all over the city. I’m underpaid and angry. The Obama administration was improving adjunct professor conditions and I imagine that this administration thinks I’m a broke, idiot loser, so I feel personally insulted.

Elizabeth from Terre Haute, Indiana.

Elizabeth from Terre Haute, Indiana.

Klein: Did you vote in the election?  

Elizabeth: I did, I voted for Hillary.  

Klein: Did you campaign at all?  

Elizabeth: No, I did not.  

 

Anna and Jackson.

Anna and Jackson.

Klein: Where are you from?  

Anna: I’m originally from Maryland

Jason: I’m from Brooklyn. I’ve lived in the city for twenty years. I’m originally from outside of New York City.

Klein: Why are you here today?  

Anna: I’m against everything that Trump campaigned on and it breaks my heart that this country is now going to be led by someone who has united a segment of our population through words of hate and antifeminism, anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant—everything that I actually am for

Jason: I’m here because I’m one-hundred-percent confident that over the next four years there’s going to be a systematic attempt to reverse all of the gains, and many of the wonderful things about this country. And if people don’t stand up right away and not allow it to happen, then it’s going to happen, and it has to start ASAP because it’s already happening, it’s already in motion, and if people don’t do something about it, it’s going to happen.

Klein: Did you do any activism during the campaign season?  

Jason: I did legal voter protection work for Hillary’s campaign in Wisconsin. I just got back on Wednesday. We did our utmost not to necessarily make sure Clinton won the election, but to make sure that everybody could vote in a state that does its utmost to keep people voting in a restrictive fashion.

Klein: Do you feel that the system in Wisconsin was still restrictive?  

Jason: The turnout was worse than it was in 2012. I think you could definitely attribute it to that. I think you could attribute it to indifference. I think that only because of some circuit court decisions did the amount of people vote, vote. But, yes, of course, if you have to show a state-issued picture ID. That probably stopped a lot of people from voting. Plus, it’s on a work day. Period. 

Chirsta from Brooklyn and Michael from Queens. 

Chirsta from Brooklyn and Michael from Queens. 

Klein: Why are you here today?

Christa: I feel a lot about what’s going on and it’s better than just sitting and being sad. You have to do something at some point.

Michael: I’m in shock. I’m scared. All of my fundamental beliefs are being threatened.

Klein: Did you do any political work during the campaign season?

Michael: I just voted for Hillary.

Christa: I voted for Hillary. I painted a mural for Bernie Sanders before Hillary was the nominee, but that’s pretty much it.

Violet Oliphant.

Violet Oliphant.

Klein: Why are you here today?

Oliphant: I can’t believe that America—I’m in shock.

Klein: Were you involved in politics before the election?

Oliphant: Not really. And I feel pretty bad about that. But the fact that Trump got elected is a good thing because it’s getting a lot of people who wouldn’t normally be politically active out there.

Klein: Other than protesting, what do you plan on doing in the future?

Oliphant: I want to volunteer and give money to Planned Parenthood. I’m trying to figure out all the things that Trump endorses and owns, and boycott them. Whatever I can do to bring awareness to people. It’s really disgusting.

Nicky Coachman and Danny Rose.

Nicky Coachman and Danny Rose.

Klein: Why are you here today?

Coachman: Why am I not here? How are we not angry? Sure we all voted and it didn’t go the way we wanted, but it’s more about the fact that we have given the highest political power to a xenophobic, racist, rapist, sexist, disgusting whack job. More people need to be angry. It’s not just about Trump. We should be terrified that Russians basically infiltrated the election.

Rose: I know people who are getting hurt on the street. My coworker two days ago now, she went out for lunch and someone legitimately grabbed her pussy. Grabber her pussy and told her, ‘Trump said this is okay now.’ She’s not the only one. There are so many posts online about people going through the same thing. Another friend posted that he saw two white boys grab a little girl’s hijab on the playground and he grabbed it back for her. This is personal, this is local, this is everywhere. This is in New York, which went for Hillary. We need to stand together and make sure people don’t keep getting hurt.

Klein: Did you do anything for Hillary’s campaign, or any other campaigns this year?

Coachman: I donated. I had some very uncomfortable conversations with members of my family. We’re still not talking. I was never silent on my support for her. What really helps and what could have helped was rather than trying to avoid weird Facebook posts, people who are going to listen to you are the ones you who love you and care about you. Silence kills.

Rose: I also donated and talked to family members, to no avail. I wish I had done more. Look where we are now.

Coachman: We just have to stay mad. We have to show the fuck up for midterms, because people who vote every four years—it’s not enough. We have to show up.